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China Is Working to Go Green…

Some people don’t realize that the heat stored in the Earth can actually be harvested and used as a source of power. Doing so can not only cut down on the use of fossil fuels, but it can also cut down on the amount of emissions being produced.

As you probably know, China (especially the Beijing area) is notorious for its air pollution caused by industries and traffic. Well, it looks like the country has had enough and is taking steps to improve its air with a few goals for 2020:

Geothermal Heating

Geothermal energy can be a great alternative to a variety of other energy sources and China has realized it. In fact, according to ThinkGeoEnergy, by 2020, the country plans to be using 70 million tons of geothermal energy in order to reduce their reliance on coal and lower the amount of pollution in the area.

Government agencies including the National Development and Reform Commission and the National Energy Administration have created a plan that focuses on using geothermal energy for heat; 40 of the 70 tons utilized annually will be used for heating purposes. And if the plan succeeds, renewable energy facilities will be supplying 1.9 trillion kilowatt-hours of electricity by the end of 2020.

Currently, coal consumption is down 0.6 percent and accounts for 59.8 percent of the country’s energy use while the share of natural gas and non-fossil fuels is up 0.3 percent and accounts for 20 percent (compared to the same time last year).

Vehicle Emissions

Emissions can come from many different sources, but the ones created by vehicles have a large impact in the country of China. That’s why recently, the Chinese government announced that any automaker producing or importing more than 30,000 cars in China must make sure that 12 percent of them are electric, plug-in hybrid, or hydrogen-powered by 2020.

While many automakers have already gotten the ball rolling on electric cars, others will have to quickly plan for a change in production – especially since electric cars are on the rise. In fact, a recent analysis from Bloomberg New Energy Finance suggests that electric vehicles could account for as many as half of all new cars sold by 2040.